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Pamela Smart seeks meeting with New Hampshire governor

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Pamela Smart seeks meeting with New Hampshire governor


Pamela Smart has requested a meeting with Gov. Chris Sununu to ask for his consideration for a commutation hearing regarding her life-without-parole sentence.Smart was 23 when she was convicted of conspiracy to commit murder in the death of her husband, Gregg, who was found shot to death in the couple’s Derry condominium on May 1, 1990. She has been in prison since her conviction in 1991. In a video sent to WMUR through a public relations agency, Pamela Smart, now 56, said she would like to express to Sununu her remorse, take responsibility for her husband’s death and discuss how she has bettered herself since her incarceration. >> Timeline: Pamela Smart case“I’m respectfully asking for the opportunity to come before you, the New Hampshire Executive Council, and have an honest conversation with you about my incarceration, my acceptance of responsibility, and any concerns you might have, any questions,” Pamela Smart said in the video. “If I could come in person or via video conference so that we could share an honest conversation, I would be extremely grateful for that.”In a letter she wrote to Sununu dated in March, Pamela Smart wrote that it took her decades to admit to herself that she was responsible for her husband’s death.”Today, I accept responsibility for the murder of my husband Gregg. I am the one to blame for his absence from this world,” Pamela Smart wrote. “I am the one who deprived Gregg of a full life with his family. I am the reason he could never enjoy his career, experience fatherhood, or guide his goddaughter throughout her life.””I am deeply sorry that my selfish choices set into motion the chain of events that ended in Gregg’s murder,” Pamela Smart wrote.”While the words, ‘I am sorry,’ could never be enough, I am committed to facing my responsibility as bravely and honestly as (Gregg Smart’s family members) deserve,” Pamela Smart wrote. Pamela Smart said in seeking a sentence reduction, she is asking for compassion and mercy. She shared that during her incarceration, she was beaten so bad she required plastic surgery. She also said that she was sexually assaulted by a prison guard.>> See the full video message from Pamela Smart here:”I wonder: when will enough be enough? My sentence appears to be a punishment without end, a vengeance that can never be stated,” Pamela Smart wrote.Smart also said her parents are both in their 80s and in declining health, and she’d like to be home to care for them in their final years. >> 2015 interview: Pamela Smart’s mother speaks to News 9In a statement released to WMUR, Sununu said, “New Hampshire’s process for commutation or pardon requests is fair and thorough. Pamela Smart will be given the same opportunity to petition the Council for a hearing as any other individual.”Last year, the New Hampshire Supreme Court denied Pamela Smart’s petition to compel the state’s executive branch to reconsider her commutation hearing request. In their ruling, the justices said they lack jurisdiction to compel the executive branch to comply with such an order.Smart applied for a commutation hearing to potentially reduce her sentence in 2022, but executive councilors unanimously voted to deny the request. It was her third unsuccessful request for such a hearing.According to Pamela Smart’s representatives, it is believed that she is the longest-serving female inmate at New York’s Bedford Hills Women’s prison, where she has been incarcerated after she was transferred there in 1993. “You know, now that I am older and able to look back on things, I can see so many errors that I made, and I can see how skewed my judgment was and how immature I was. Looking backwards, you know, I, I’m such a different person than I was and more thoughtful before, you know, I think things through before I make decisions, and less impulsive and just more responsible and mature than I was back then,” Pamela Smart said in the video. “I mean it’s– 34 years is a very long time, and during that time, I’ve done a lot of work on myself and a lot of spiritual work and just had a, a big growth in who I am and how I deal with things and people.”By June 2015, all four men involved in Gregg Smart’s murder were released from prison. Three of them were minors at the time of the killing. Patrick Randall, 17 at the time, held Gregg Smart down as Billy Flynn, 16 at the time, shot him in the head.Two other accomplices in the case, Raymond Fowler, 18 at the time, and Vance Lattime, 17 at the time, were paroled in 2005. Both were in the getaway car outside the home where Gregg Smart was killed.

Pamela Smart has requested a meeting with Gov. Chris Sununu to ask for his consideration for a commutation hearing regarding her life-without-parole sentence.

Smart was 23 when she was convicted of conspiracy to commit murder in the death of her husband, Gregg, who was found shot to death in the couple’s Derry condominium on May 1, 1990. She has been in prison since her conviction in 1991.

In a video sent to WMUR through a public relations agency, Pamela Smart, now 56, said she would like to express to Sununu her remorse, take responsibility for her husband’s death and discuss how she has bettered herself since her incarceration.

>> Timeline: Pamela Smart case

“I’m respectfully asking for the opportunity to come before you, the New Hampshire Executive Council, and have an honest conversation with you about my incarceration, my acceptance of responsibility, and any concerns you might have, any questions,” Pamela Smart said in the video. “If I could come in person or via video conference so that we could share an honest conversation, I would be extremely grateful for that.”

In a letter she wrote to Sununu dated in March, Pamela Smart wrote that it took her decades to admit to herself that she was responsible for her husband’s death.

“Today, I accept responsibility for the murder of my husband Gregg. I am the one to blame for his absence from this world,” Pamela Smart wrote. “I am the one who deprived Gregg of a full life with his family. I am the reason he could never enjoy his career, experience fatherhood, or guide his goddaughter throughout her life.”

“I am deeply sorry that my selfish choices set into motion the chain of events that ended in Gregg’s murder,” Pamela Smart wrote.

“While the words, ‘I am sorry,’ could never be enough, I am committed to facing my responsibility as bravely and honestly as (Gregg Smart’s family members) deserve,” Pamela Smart wrote.

Pamela Smart said in seeking a sentence reduction, she is asking for compassion and mercy.

She shared that during her incarceration, she was beaten so bad she required plastic surgery. She also said that she was sexually assaulted by a prison guard.

>> See the full video message from Pamela Smart here:

“I wonder: when will enough be enough? My sentence appears to be a punishment without end, a vengeance that can never be stated,” Pamela Smart wrote.

Smart also said her parents are both in their 80s and in declining health, and she’d like to be home to care for them in their final years.

>> 2015 interview: Pamela Smart’s mother speaks to News 9

In a statement released to WMUR, Sununu said, “New Hampshire’s process for commutation or pardon requests is fair and thorough. Pamela Smart will be given the same opportunity to petition the Council for a hearing as any other individual.”

Last year, the New Hampshire Supreme Court denied Pamela Smart’s petition to compel the state’s executive branch to reconsider her commutation hearing request. In their ruling, the justices said they lack jurisdiction to compel the executive branch to comply with such an order.

Smart applied for a commutation hearing to potentially reduce her sentence in 2022, but executive councilors unanimously voted to deny the request. It was her third unsuccessful request for such a hearing.

According to Pamela Smart’s representatives, it is believed that she is the longest-serving female inmate at New York’s Bedford Hills Women’s prison, where she has been incarcerated after she was transferred there in 1993.

“You know, now that I am older and able to look back on things, I can see so many errors that I made, and I can see how skewed my judgment was and how immature I was. Looking backwards, you know, I, I’m such a different person than I was and more thoughtful before, you know, I think things through before I make decisions, and less impulsive and just more responsible and mature than I was back then,” Pamela Smart said in the video. “I mean it’s– 34 years is a very long time, and during that time, I’ve done a lot of work on myself and a lot of spiritual work and just had a, a big growth in who I am and how I deal with things and people.”

By June 2015, all four men involved in Gregg Smart’s murder were released from prison. Three of them were minors at the time of the killing.

Patrick Randall, 17 at the time, held Gregg Smart down as Billy Flynn, 16 at the time, shot him in the head.

Two other accomplices in the case, Raymond Fowler, 18 at the time, and Vance Lattime, 17 at the time, were paroled in 2005. Both were in the getaway car outside the home where Gregg Smart was killed.



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