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Best available players left in 2024 NHL Draft entering Day 2

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Best available players left in 2024 NHL Draft entering Day 2


Follow our live coverage of the 2024 NHL Draft.

The first round of the 2024 NHL Draft has wrapped up, but there’s still plenty of talent available entering Day 2.

Here are the 20 best skaters and three best goalies still available on my draft board.

Read more: Check out all of our coverage of 2024 NHL Draft.

Top 20 Remaining Skaters

1. Igor Chernyshov, LW, Dynamo Moskva (KHL)

November 30, 2005 | 6′ 2″ | 196 pounds

Tier: Bubble top and middle of the lineup player

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: Above NHL average
Shot: Above NHL average

Player comparable: Ilya MIkheyev

Analysis: Chernyshov was very good at the junior level in Russia and earned ice time up in the KHL with a regular shift for a top team in Dynamo Moscow. He’s a big, powerful winger who skates well and has a lot of offensive creativity. He beats defenders routinely with his one-on-one plays, sees the ice well and can create at the net. He’s not going to run players over with his physical play, but he uses his body to create offense. He has the ability to control play at even strength due to his variety of tools and looks the part of a potential strong top-six winger in the NHL.

2. Leo Sahlin Wallenius, LHD, Växjö Lakers HC J20 (J20 Nationell)

April 10, 2006 | 6′ 0″ | 183 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: Above NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: Above NHL average
Shot: Above NHL average

Player comparable: Erik Brannstrom

Analysis: Sahlin Wallenius isn’t the biggest defenseman, but he’s a very solid two-way player who was the leading player on Sweden’s U18 team this season. He’s one of the best skaters in the draft. He has a powerful and efficient stride that allows him to easily evade pressure and skate pucks up ice. He closes on checks well and is great coming back on pucks in a way that should translate to pro hockey. Sahlin Wallenius has good hands and vision and can shoot the puck well, too, even though he doesn’t project as a major scorer at the higher levels. The sum of his parts looks like a regular NHL defenseman.

Leo Sahlin Wallenius Steven Ellis Daily Faceoff


Sahlin Wallenius ranked No. 21 on Pronman’s May draft ranking. (Steven Ellis / Daily Faceoff)

3. Charlie Elick, RHD, Brandon Wheat Kings (WHL)

January 17, 2006 | 6′ 4″ | 203 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: Above NHL average
Puck skills: Below NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: Above NHL average

Player comparable: Braden Schneider

Analysis: Elick is a very intriguing pro prospect. He is one of the best skaters in the draft, with a smooth and powerful skating stride. When those feet are combined with his 6-3 frame, strong compete and a little mean streak, he has the potential to be a legit shutdown defenseman in the NHL. Elick isn’t a natural puck-mover and can make some questionable puck decisions. He will need to clean that up, but he has good hands and isn’t a negative with the puck on his stick. In a role where he just needs to defend well and make a basic outlet, he could potentially have an NHL career.

4. Linus Eriksson, C, Djurgårdens IF (HockeyAllsvenskan)

March 23, 2006 | 6′ 0″ | 190 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: Above NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: Above NHL average

Player comparable: Robby Fabbri

Analysis: Eriksson was a top player for a good J20 team this season in Sweden and a leader for Sweden’s U18 club. He wasn’t a dominant junior player, but in the second half of the season, when he advanced to the Allsvenskan, he showed quite well versus men. He’s a well-rounded center. Eriksson is a strong skater who creates offense with speed and has the transition game to be a quality pro. He has very good skill and playmaking ability. He is a creative player with a pass-first mentality who sees seams well and can generate offense from the perimeter. Eriksson’s work ethic is good enough. I wouldn’t call him the type who is going to run over opponents, but he gets to the inside and gives an honest effort every night. He was also the captain for his Swedish age group. He could be a middle-six NHL forward.

5. Dominik Badinka, RHD, Malmö Redhawks (SHL)

November 27, 2005 | 6′ 3″ | 185 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: NHL average

Player comparable: Justin Holl

Analysis: Badinka moved from Finland to Sweden this season, where he became an SHL regular after a strong start in the J20 level. He was cut from Czechia’s world junior team, though. He has a lot of NHL attributes between his size, mobility and ability to make offensive plays. He has a powerful stride and has shown versus men he can make skilled plays and move pucks with a good tempo. His pure playmaking doesn’t excite you, although I see secondary offense coming from him in the NHL. Badinka defends well enough due to his feet and length but he isn’t going to run guys over, which leaves some scouts wondering if he’s going to be a tweener as a pro. I think his two-way game is strong enough to be a potential No. 4-5 defenseman in the NHL.

6. Nikita Artamonov, RW, Torpedo Nizhny Novgorod (KHL)

November 17, 2005 | 5′ 11″ | 187 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: Above NHL average
Hockey sense: Above NHL average
Compete: NHL average

Player comparable: Nick Schmaltz

Analysis: Artamonov played a notable role on a KHL team, including as an important part of Torpedo’s power play. He’s a forward with excellent hands, sense and vision and can make a lot of creative plays. That he’s a strong skater and able to create offense with pace is what has helped his game translate versus men so quickly, as he has often beaten KHL defensemen with his skill. You rarely see KHL draft eligibles help a team, never mind two on the same club in him and Anton Silayev. Artamonov isn’t that big, he isn’t a natural finisher, and while he competes well enough, I wouldn’t call him the type of competitor you’d love to have in a small winger. It’s why he projects more as a middle-six scorer.

7. Matvei Shuravin, LHD, Krasnaya Armiya Moskva (MHL)

March 22, 2006 | 6′ 2″ | 172 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: NHL average

Player comparable: Derek Forbort

Analysis: Shuravin’s production in Russia’s junior league won’t jump out at you, but he has a lot of traits that NHL teams will be looking for and has looked good versus juniors and men this season. He’s a 6-3, mobile defenseman with puck-moving skill, and those are always highly sought after. Shuravin has a low panic threshold and, with his skating, has a smooth, effortless game style that leads to a lot of puck possession for his team. He is good on retrievals and generates a lot of controlled exits and entries. Shuravin also competes well enough and doesn’t shy away from physical play.

8. Julius Miettinen, C, Everett Silvertips (WHL)

January 20, 2006 | 6′ 3″ | 201 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: NHL average

Player comparable: Eetu Luostarinen

Analysis: Miettinen started off slow in his first season in North America but caught fire as the year went along and became a big part of a successful Everett team. Miettinen is a big-body forward with very good offensive skills. He has the one-on-one play to beat pro defensemen and do so with pace. He shows a lot of creativity inside the offensive zone as a puckhandler and passer. He can create off the perimeter and around the net due to his frame. I wouldn’t call his compete level high, but it’s good enough given his frame. He’s a strong skater. I wish he’d play a bit quicker at times, but he has a powerful stride and can skate with pros. He has a chance to be a third-line center.

9. Adam Kleber, RHD, Lincoln Stars (USHL)

March 24, 2006 | 6′ 5″ | 214 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: Below NHL average
Puck skills: Below NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: Above NHL average

Player comparable: Ryan Graves

Analysis: Kleber’s game has developed well as the season has progressed. He is a very athletic defenseman who projects to be a strong pro defender. He’s 6-5, skates well for a big man and competes hard enough. He will be quite difficult for even NHL forwards to get by or try to gain footing around the net. Kleber’s offensive play is what has sold me on him. I didn’t originally think he was a true puck-mover, and still don’t, but he’s shown enough sense with the puck this season for me to think he can have an NHL career.

10. Adam Jecho, RW, Edmonton Oil Kings (WHL)

March 24, 2006 | 6′ 5″ | 201 pounds

Tier: Middle of the lineup player

Skating: Below NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: Below NHL average
Compete: NHL average
Shot: Above NHL average

Player comparable: Alexei Toropchenko

Analysis: Jecho’s development hasn’t taken off like some scouts hoped when we saw him years ago, but he remains a good pro prospect. He’s a huge winger who skates quite well for a guy his size even if he’s not a blazer. Jecho has good hands and can shoot the puck well from range. He tends to fade into the background at times, whether due to a mixture of sense or compete issues — I think it’s mostly the former. He’s a guy you have to dream on a bit and who often frustrates scouts, but his athletic toolkit is hard to find and if he scores enough at higher levels, coaches will play him regularly.

11. Lucas Pettersson, C, MoDo Hockey J20 (J20 Nationell)

April 17, 2006 | 5′ 11″ | 172 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: High-end

Analysis: Pettersson was a productive player at the junior level in Sweden and a leader for its U18 team. Pettersson is a skilled forward with good speed who can make a lot of difficult plays. Pettersson’s motor is excellent, too. He wins a lot of battles, and despite his size, he excels in the tough areas of the offensive zone. He’s not the most dynamic player you’ll ever see, but the sum of the parts looks like a potential bottom-six forward or fourth-line center in the NHL.

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Henry Mews is skilled enough to get NHL games but will need to round out his play. (Chris Tanouye / Getty Images)

12. Henry Mews, RHD, Ottawa 67’s (OHL)

March 9, 2006 | 6′ 0″ | 185 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: Above NHL average
Compete: NHL average

Analysis: Mews had a slightly underwhelming draft-eligible season, sliding after coming in as a potential top prospect and after a great Hlinka Gretzky in the summer. He’s very intelligent with the puck. Mews shows good poise and creativity making plays on top of a strong point shot. He skates well and can both skate and pass pucks out of trouble. He got his points this year, but the issues for him this season were defensive. He struggled in his own end, getting pushed around physically. He was a decent defender coming up, so I wonder if he can bounce back in that regard. He’s skilled enough to get NHL games but will need to round out his play, especially as an average-sized player.

13. Luca Marrelli, RHD, Oshawa Generals (OHL)

October 4, 2005 | 6′ 2″ | 185 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: Below NHL average
Hockey sense: Above NHL average
Compete: NHL average
Shot: Above NHL average

Analysis: Marrelli was an important player for Oshawa this season playing in all situations. He’s a strong skating defenseman who can close on pucks defensively well and is able to attack with speed. Offensively he won’t be a dominant pro, but he has skill and creative playmaking in his game. Marrelli can activate off the blue line, create off the rush, has a good point shot and shows instincts to hit seams as well. He competes fine but isn’t overly physical and is average-sized. He lacks a clear defined role in the NHL, even if he has a lot of positives. He has a real chance to play games.

14. Harrison Brunicke, RHD, Kamloops Blazers (WHL)

May 8, 2006 | 6′ 3″ | 187 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: Below NHL average
Compete: Above NHL average

Analysis: Brunicke was solid on a bottom-feeding Kamloops team this season and played well for Canada’s U18 team to end his year. Brunicke is a toolsy defenseman. He’s 6-3, skates well and has a strong offensive skill level. On his best shift with the way he can rush up ice and activate off the blue line, he looks like a legit NHL prospect. Brunicke can make some tough plays, but he forces a lot of his decisions, doesn’t always see the ice well and is running around in his own end. He probably isn’t a big points type as a pro, but with his feet, length and a strong compete level, if he’s just OK with the puck, he can be a third-pair defenseman.

15. Jesse Pulkkinen, LHD, JYP (Liiga)

December 27, 2004 | 6′ 6″ | 220 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: Below NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: Below NHL average
Compete: Above NHL average

Analysis: After scoring four points in Finland’s junior league in his first draft season, Pulkkinen took massive steps forward in his second draft-eligible season. He scored big numbers at the junior level and then got brought up to Liiga. He also made Finland’s world junior team as a top-four defenseman. Pulkkinen is very toolsy. He’s a 6-foot-6 defender who skates quite well for his size. His straight-line speed is quite strong, although his first step or two aren’t the quickest. Pulkkinen defends well due to his length and physicality. Offensively, he doesn’t stand out as much, but he has hands and can make checkers miss. He fights the puck at times when he needs to make quick decisions, though. If his first pass and decisions get more consistent he could be a legit longtime NHL defender, but for now, I see a third-pair type.

16. Timur Kol, LHD, Omskie Krylia (VHL)

August 23, 2006 | 6′ 3″ | 198 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: Below NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: NHL average
Shot: Above NHL average

Analysis: Kol played up for a larger part of the season in Russia versus men in its second-tier league. He is a talented, offensively tilted defenseman. He’s a smart puck-mover who can make a strong first pass and create from the offensive blue line. His skating stride isn’t technically great, drawing ire from scouts due to how much he inside-outs his feet. He is a powerful skater, though, who can escape pressure and activate off the point. He has a good shot and enough skill to get points versus men. His defensive play isn’t as strong. He lacks physicality and his defensive coverage needs some work. The hope is with his frame and mobility he can make enough stops and retrievals as a pro to go with his skill. He could be a third-pair defenseman.

17. Maxim Massé, RW, Chicoutimi Saguenéens (QMJHL)

April 7, 2006 | 6′ 2″ | 190 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: Poor
Puck skills: Above NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: Below NHL average
Shot: High-end

Analysis: Massé is a tough evaluation. He had a great underage season in the QMJHL and was the top rookie in the CHL. He had a good draft season but didn’t put up the huge numbers some expected. He has a ton of offensive skill and IQ and good size as well. Massé is also a dangerous goal scorer who can wire bullets from the faceoff dot with his one-timer. There’s no doubt about what he can do with the puck inside the offensive zone, but getting the puck into the zone will be a major challenge for him in the NHL due to his skating. He’s a technically flawed skater and that will be his major challenge in having an NHL career on top of giving inconsistent efforts without the puck. His offensive gifts and size should get him games but he will need to prove to NHL coaches he can be trusted for a regular shift.

18. Ryder Ritchie, RW, Prince Albert Raiders (WHL)

August 3, 2006 | 6′ 0″ | 176 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: Above NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: NHL average

Analysis: Ritchie was the best rookie in the WHL last season and a top player for Canada’s U18 team this summer but his season in Prince Albert wasn’t as impressive. He is an average-sized winger, but he brings a ton of skill to the table. He is a very elusive forward due to his skating and hands and can make a lot of tough plays with pace. His effort is fine but his consistency could be better. I also don’t think he’s a dynamic playmaking winger but instead a very good one. He has NHL talent, but I don’t see a clear role for him and I think he could frustrate coaches as well.

19. Carson Wetsch, RW, Calgary Hitmen (WHL)

May 4, 2006 | 6′ 2″ | 201 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: High-end

Analysis: Wetsch didn’t put up huge numbers in the WHL this season, but I liked him often when I watched his games. He was also an important part of Canada’s U18 team in the summer and spring. Wetsch’s game is defined by his speed and energy. He isn’t the most skilled player in the world and isn’t huge, but he’s always around the puck. He’s a quick skater who closes on plays well, but it’s how hard he works that makes him so noticeable. He’s hard on every puck and wins a ton of battles. That he has good hands and vision and can make some plays allows him to be an effective forward. He has the ability to kill penalties and be a trusted two-way bottom-six wing in the NHL.

20. Jacob Battaglia, RW, Kingston Frontenacs (OHL)

March 17, 2006 | 6′ 0″ | 205 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Puck skills: NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average
Compete: NHL average
Shot: Above NHL average

Analysis: Battaglia was an important and productive player for Kingston and has developed quite well since being picked in the second round of his OHL Draft. He’s very offensively talented. Battaglia has the quick hands and high-end creativity to make a lot of things happen with the puck. He often beats defenders with his one-on-one play. He also is a strong playmaker who makes tough plays in traffic and off the perimeter. His pure effort level isn’t amazing off the puck, but it’s good enough. He plays fast, is a strong skater and has a play style that could translate into a bottom-six wing.

Top 3 Remaining Goalies

1. Marcus Gidlöf, G, Leksands IF J20 (J20 Nationell)

September 28, 2005 | 6′ 6″ | 212 pounds

Tier: Starting goaltender

Skating: Below NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average

Player comparable: Adin Hill

Analysis: Gidlöf had a very good season in Sweden as a top goalie in their junior league. His pro projection is highly intriguing as a 6-6 goalie who moves well for his size. His pure quickness side to side isn’t explosive, but he can make tough saves and is difficult to beat laterally. Gidlöf tracks the play well and often stays square with the puck. He plays aggressive as well. Some nitpick that his technique breaks down too much, he can scramble too much in the net and he let a few too many long-range shots past him. He has legit starting-goalie tools if he cleans up a few details.

2. Mikhail Yegorov, G, Omaha Lancers (USHL)

March 7, 2006 | 6′ 5″ | 187 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: NHL average
Hockey sense: Below NHL average

Analysis: Yegorov came over from the CSKA program to the USHL this season. He emerged as Omaha’s full-time goalie, although his performance was inconsistent. Yegorov has clear pro potential. He’s nearly 6-5 and moves quite well in the net. I wouldn’t call his side-to-side movements explosive, but he can make tough saves and is nimble for a guy his size. On his best nights, where he’s squaring up pucks, and given the type of stops he can make, he looks like a clear NHL goalie. Too often, that doesn’t happen, though. Yegorov can struggle with his reads and decisions, challenging at the wrong time or struggling to pick up where the puck is going. He projects as a backup goalie in the NHL but has a chance to become a starter if he really hits.

3. Pavel Moysevich, G, SKA-Neva St. Petersburg (VHL)

September 29, 2004 | 6′ 5″ | 176 pounds

Tier: Projected to play NHL games

Skating: Below NHL average
Hockey sense: NHL average

Analysis: Moysevich had a great second draft-eligible season. He was excellent versus pros in the VHL and KHL and even got KHL playoff action. He is a huge goalie at 6-5. I was intrigued by him two seasons ago, but he didn’t get much playing time, so it was hard to get a true read on him. This season, he played more and looks like a legit prospect. He’s not super athletic or twitchy, but he moves well enough for his size. He is a smart and competitive goalie who can make a lot of high-difficulty saves. He gets caught flat-footed at times due to the lack of high-end quickness, but I think the tools are good enough to potentially be a backup goalie in the NHL.

(Top photo of Charlie Elick: Jonathan Kozub / Getty Images)



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